Monday, May 1, 2017

#StudentVoice in History - Birmingham, Alabama

As much as I am a proponent of student voice, I do worry that it is seen as a fad, or the next "new thing" in education. Frankly, student voice has been rooted in education and our country for more than fifty years.

In 1963, in Birmingham, Alabama, student voice was in the forefront of the Civil Rights Movement, specifically through what is now known as the Children's Crusade or March, during the first week of May. Thousands of students walked out of their schools and prepared to march through downtown Birmingham:



Of course, what happened to them during the march is seared into our collective conscience:








The willingness of those students to use their voices, suffer brutality at the hands of the police and fire departments, and go to jail, was a turning point in the Civil Rights Movement.

When we talk about student voice today, it is usually not in these same sort of circumstances. But, we do discuss it within the same theme: democracy.

The bravery of these students in 1963 changed our country, for the better. Our students today want to use their voices as change agents, too. How will we respond, both in our schools and in our society?

Join the conversation...
How do students use their voice in school and society today? What are your experiences?








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