Monday, June 5, 2017

This Book Will Change Your Life

Aspire High

My friend (and student voice research colleague) lent this book to me. I've been meaning to read it, but it has sat on my desk for a few weeks. This morning, I started thumbing through it and read so many nuggets of truth. Here are just five:

  • "Students are neither your customers nor your clients; they are your partners...their points of view on your classrooms, school, and district provide vital information if you are to improve their education."
  • "[T]here is no 'color-blindness'...race is a factor in students' experiences of the world, as are other physical attributes such as gender or being differently abled. As a result, students can teach their teachers a great deal about how their backgrounds, thoughts, feelings, and worldviews are shaped by race, particularly if student and teacher come from different racial backgrounds."
  • "In nearly every learning situation, point of view matters. One student may count the paragraphs in eager anticipation of his turn to read aloud, whereas another may dread the very thought of speaking in front of others."
  • "[A]dults are the school's 'leading learners." They are learning role models, continually curious, constantly questioning, wondering, probing, failing, and pushing themselves and the young people in their classes to go further, deeper, and broader."
  • "[T]he focus is not on evaluation in this sense, but rather on teacher growth and formation based on what the teacher is consistently , constantly learning and applying. Teacher learning, in turn, is directed by the teacher and is informed by the school's goals. Teachers are not just learning for learning's sake, but for their students' sakes -- more to the point, for their students' aspirations' sakes. Obviously, students are integral to this growth process. Teachers are held accountable for their learning as it applies to student learning and outcomes."
This book has and continues to change my thinking (if not my life). Any of you out there want to join in a book study this summer? We could engage in a chapter-by-chapter discussion through technology. 

Join the conversation...
Have you read the book? What are your thoughts on the bulleted items? Interested in the book study?



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